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Solloway M. [1995]. Oral health for low income children: Expanding access to dental services under EPSDT. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center, 26 pp, (Hiscock Collection; related).

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center
Georgetown University Box 571272
Washington, DC 20057-1272

Telephone: (202) 784-9771
E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu
Website: http://www.mchoralhealth.org
Available from the website.

This report explores the implications of changes mandated by the 1989 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA '89) for expanding access to oral health services under Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Testing (EPSDT). After providing a general overview of EPSDT and oral health for children from families with low incomes, the report examines the feasibility of using dentists and dental hygienists as primary care health professionals and recommends policy changes to increase the role of oral health professionals in primary care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]


Details

Feinson C, Solloway M. 1993. Oral health providers as primary care providers under EPSDT. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center, 27 pp.

George Washington University, Center for Health Policy Research
2021 K Street, N.W., Suite 800
Washington, DC 20006

Telephone: (202) 994-4100
Fax: (202) 994-4040
E-mail: info@gwhealthpolicy.org
Website: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/projects/center-health-policy-research
Available at no charge.

This report considers the effect of Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Testing (EPSDT) program revisions on the provision of oral health care to children and adolescents covered by the program. The 1989 Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA '89) included oral health professionals as primary health providers under the terms of the original program. The introduction reviews the background of the EPSDT program and the OBRA '89 changes. The report then considers the feasibility of using dentists and dental hygienists as primary care providers, reviews the advantages of doing so, and recommends policy changes to increase the role of oral health providers in primary care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

         

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